Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If … The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears is a famous line from a speech in the play Julius Caesar.

So let it be with Caesar. A few lines before this speech, Brutus says, "Romans, countrymen, and lovers! The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious: If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answer'd it. About “Friends, Romans, Countrymen” This monologue from Act 3, Scene 2 in Julius Caesar is one of the most famous in all of Shakespeare. Hear me for my cause, and be silent, that you may hear" (3.2.13-14). Boom. The succession of hard stresses is also Shakespeare's way of using the verse to help Antony cut through the din of the crowd. The evil that men do lives after them; 75The good is oft interrèd with their bones. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interrèd with their bones. The noble Brutus.

Contents [ hide] 1 Friends, Romans, Countrymen, Lend Me Your Ears Meaning. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. The character is inviting those around him to listen to him. So let it be with Caesar. The noble Brutus Hath told you Caesar was ambitious. Antony twists this and uses it to say Brutus and gang are not who they appear to be.

Julius Caesar "Friends, Romans, countrymen...." / / - / - - / - - / Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; From a rhythmic perspective, the trochaic feel of this opening immediately commands attention. If it were so, it was a grievous fault, And grievously hath Caesar answered it. Read the ‘Friends, Romans, countrymen’ Julius Caesar monologue below with a modern English translation & analysis: Spoken by Marc Antony, Julius Caesar, Act 3 Scene 2.

I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. I have come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. 'Twere best he speak no harm of Brutus here. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears. (from Julius Caesar, spoken by Marc Antony) Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interréd with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones; So let it be with Caesar. His whole speech is filled with rhetorical devices that encourage the listeners to be on his side. Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ears; I come to bury Caesar, not to praise him.