Originally issued by King John of England (r. 1199–1216) as a practical solution to the political crisis he faced in 1215, Magna Carta established for the first time the principle that everybody, including the king, was subject to the law. These are interesting authors, since Anthony Arlidge has been a Queen’s Counsel for over 30 years and in 1990 he was called upon during a case to argue the meaning of clause 40 of Magna Carta, while Igor Judge was a judge for 25 years and retired as Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales in … In later ages, it came to be regarded as the cornerstone of English liberty. The Magna Carta said that the king could not sell or deny rights to the English people. Magna Carta, meaning ‘The Great Charter’, is one of the most famous documents in the world. The 800-year old document referred to as Magna Carta has been celebrated over time as the beginning of a foundation of personal rights under British law, including for systems based on British Law like the legal system in the United States of America, or a return to the personal rights that had been lost under Norman occupation after 1066. Other colonists cited "the assembly of barons at Runnymede, when Magna Carta was signed" as precedent for the Continental Congress (Bailyn 1992, 173 n. 13). King John promises that the English church has the right to elect its own officials. And this goes way beyond all the other demands because even the Pope agrees…and he's holy so you'll do what he says forever and ever. The Magna Carta is a document with which King John of England granted certain privileges and right to his subjects. It consists of a preamble and 63 clauses, written in Latin, presented by the king to a group of rebellious barons, his royal vassals, at Runnymede, a meadow beside the Themes not far from … It was sealed in June 1215. BACK; NEXT ; 60 Clauses…And Absolutely No Organizational Structure. Magna Carta: Clauses Summary. The achievement of the Magna Charta, then, is found not only in the original meaning understood by Englanders of the thirteenth century, but also in the subsequent application of the document's principles. Clause 39 of Magna Carta provided: “No free man shall be seized or imprisoned, or stripped of his rights or possessions, or outlawed or exiled, or deprived of his standing in any other way, nor will we proceed with force against him, or send others to do so, except by the lawful judgment of …

Hart Publishing has just published Magna Carta Uncovered by Anthony Arlidge and Igor Judge.