By Melissa Mayer. Each stage is followed by 1 or 2 indicating whether it belongs to meiosis 1 or 2. The first division is meiosis 1, which features both independent assortment and crossing over. Email . How meiosis reduces chromosome number by half: crossing over, meiosis I, meiosis II, and genetic variation. Before a dividing cell enters meiosis, it undergoes a period of growth called interphase. It is divided into several stages that include, prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase. Each of the two meiotic divisions is divided into interphase, prophase, metaphase, anaphase and telophase. Meiosis 1 Stages.

If you're seeing this message, it means we're having trouble loading external resources on our website. Meiosis 2: Definition, Stages, Meiosis 1 vs Meiosis 2. Updated March 26, 2019. Meiosis 1 separates the pair of homologous chromosomes and reduces the diploid cell to haploid. Share .

At the end of the meiotic process, four daughter cells are produced. Meiosis is the process that is responsible for genetic diversity in eukaryotes.
Print . Meiosis produces gamete hereditary diversity in two ways: (1) Law of Independent Assortment of homologous … Meiosis I and II are each classified into prophase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase stages. Accordingly, meiosis incorporates the phases of meiosis I (prophase I, metaphase I, anaphase I, telophase I) and meiosis II (prophase II, metaphase II, anaphase II, and telophase II). Meiosis 2 results in separation the sister chromatids and for this reason, it is known as equatorial division. Also Read: Significance of Meiosis. Tweet . Each complete two-division sequence results in the production of four gametes, or sex cells, each containing 23 chromosomes. When you hear the term sexual reproduction, you might not immediately picture cell division (unless you are already a cell biology aficionado).

How meiosis reduces chromosome number by half: crossing over, meiosis I, meiosis II, and genetic variation. There are two stages or phases of meiosis: meiosis I and meiosis II.