The perhaps most prominent mechanistic explanation for the uncanny valley effect is the perceptual mismatch theory, which describes inconsistent features such as robot eyes in a human face as trigger of the uncanny feeling. The weird way the faces look when superimposed on moving cartoon characters is an example of the uncanny valley effect. The uncanny valley is a heterogeneous group of phenomena. Uncanny valley: 6 robots so creepy they’ll haunt your dreams SPECIAL OFFER ... An astonishing and scary vision for the future, which is not helped by her admitting “she will destroy humans”.

First thing first, both of these are 2d animation.
The Uncanny Valley This is a hypothesised relationship between familiarity, and humanoid resemblance in appearance and movement. The average person knows these aren't real but accepts them anyway.

It's when something, like a doll, looks almost human, but there is just something slightly....off. I don't know what it was that weirded people out though, its as though dead bodies without the familiar exterior were not supposed to take the forms of … The idea is fairly simple: That which looks entirely human can be attractive to us and that which looks entirely unhuman can seem threatening or fascinating. Have you heard of the uncanny valley?

The uncanny valley is the idea that as nonhuman entities — such as robots and animation — approach a human-like appearance, they become more unsettling. The uncanny valley would not exist if a robot was indistinguishable from a human, because there would no longer be a relative dip in emotional response. Scientists are investigating how to get around it. It's a valley because, supposedly, if you plot appealingness of robots and similar anthropomorphic figure on a spectrum from highly realistic to cartoonish, there's a valley in the middle. Phenomena labeled as being in the uncanny valley can be diverse, involve different sense modalities, and have multiple, possibly overlapping causes, which can range from evolved or learned circuits for early face perception to culturally-shared psychological constructs. Keep up. I will be posting images as I explain. This theory has been applied in multiple studies that used altered images to reliably create feelings of eeriness in subjects presented with them.

The Uncanny Valley Runquist cites the theory first advanced by Masahiro Mori in 1970 known as the "Uncanny Valley", a concept in robotics which " is defined as a level of realism in robots in which the human observer has a negative reaction.

Originally coined by Masahiro Mori in 1970, the term “uncanny valley” describes our strange revulsion toward things that appear nearly human, but not quite right.. The uncanny valley effect happens when people feel creeped out by lifelike androids and computer-rendered human characters. This revulsion usually involves robots, but can also include computer animations and some medical conditions. Here’s what that means. The concept is that things that look human, but aren’t quite, are the most unsettling – or elicit feelings of the Uncanny. When you said that fears can be evolutionary, it made me think. Scientists are investigating how to get around it. The uncanny valley effect happens when people feel creeped out by lifelike androids and computer-rendered human characters. Other examples include robots that … One of the popular uses of the term "uncanny" comes from the "uncanny valley" hypothesis offered by aesthetic theorists. I suppose that was me missing the uncanny effect, which I didn't really grasp from my first read of the Uncanny Valley. Human-like robots are pretty amazing but when they aren’t quite human enough they begin to cross into the “uncanny valley.” Here’s what that means. It's a valley because, supposedly, if you plot appealingness of robots and similar anthropomorphic figure on a spectrum from highly realistic to cartoonish, there's a valley in the middle. For some reason, things that are almost humanlike, like a doll or a lifelike robot, are creepy and disturbing to almost all humans. However, between the familiar and the unfamiliar lies the uncanny valley. Why is that? The Uncanny Valley. The weird way the faces look when superimposed on moving cartoon characters is an example of the uncanny valley effect. Because it is, in some subtle way, not human to our perception.
Other examples include robots that …